Canada delivered only 3.2m of the 40m COVID-19 doses it pledged to poor countries

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, a supposedly caring and compassionate "world leader", has so far delivered only 3.2 million (8%) of the 40 million life-saving COVID-19 doses Canada pledged to Africa and other poor regions of the Global South with overwhelming BIPOC (Black people, Indigenous people, People of Colour) majorities, according to a damning report released this week by the People’s Vaccine Alliance.
Photo credit: Jess Hurd/Global Justice Now via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

BY OBERT MADONDO | @Obiemad | OCT. 23, 2021

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, a supposedly caring and compassionate “world leader”, has so far delivered only 3.2 million (8%) of the 40 million life-saving COVID-19 doses Canada pledged to Africa and other poor regions of the Global South with overwhelming BIPOC (Black people, Indigenous people, People of Colour) majorities, according to a damning report released this week by the People’s Vaccine Alliance.

The report, A Dose of Reality (PDF), highlights Canada’s unfulfilled white saviour industrial complex-inspired vaccine donation promises to BIPOC-majority low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), COVID-19 vaccine hoarding, unfair grabbing of 972,000 COVID-19 doses from the COVAX global vaccine sharing facility “despite the extreme shortages in LMICs and having already secured more than enough doses through bilateral agreements”, strange donation of 112,030 vaccine doses to white-majority high income countries, and central place at the heart of the burgeoning global injustice of COVID-19 vaccine apartheid.

According to the report:

Despite extreme vaccine shortages in developing countries, Canada and the United Kingdom took an estimated 1.5 million doses from COVAX this year. Meanwhile the two countries have barely delivered on their vaccine donation pledges – the UK and Canada have delivered only 9.6 percent and 8 percent of promises doses, respectively.

The report also highlights the white saviour industrial complex-informed promises made by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and other G7 leaders before, during and after this year’s G7 summit, hosted by the United Kingdom in June.

According to the report, to justify their vaccine apartheid-nurturing hoarding of COVID-19 vaccines, in recent months, “the G7 and the EU have made headline-seeking promises to assist low- and middle-income countries by donating doses – yet have repeatedly delayed or broken these promises.”

Through the G7 summit’s final communiqué, Trudeau and other G7 leaders loudly pledged to end the global COVID-19 pandemic and “prepare for the future by driving an intensified international effort, starting immediately, to vaccinate the world by getting as many safe vaccines to as many people as possible as fast as possible”.

Data analyzed by the People’s Vaccine Alliance for its damning report “confirms that announcements and pledges that grabbed global headlines were either too optimistic, have not been met, are not accurate or may eventually be met but on a timeline that is too slow for the millions of people that are waiting for a COVID-19 vaccine.”

The People’s Vaccine Alliance, a global coalition of international rights organizations, 175 former world leaders and Nobel prize winning scientists, and 2 million rights activists worldwide, advocates for COVID-19 vaccines to be treated as global public goods to facilitate global vaccine equity. The coalition’s members and supporters, including Global Justice Now, Amnesty International, Oxfam, Public Citizen, ActionAid and SumofUs, are “united under a common aim of campaigning for a “people’s vaccine” for COVID-19 that is based on shared knowledge and is freely available to everyone everywhere.”

According to the coalition’s report:

Our best chance of all staying safe is to ensure a COVID-19 vaccine is available for all as a global common good. This will only be possible with a transformation in how vaccines are produced and distributed – pharmaceutical corporations must allow the COVID-19 vaccines to be produced as widely as possible by sharing their knowledge free from patents.

The coalition’s report also articulated the costly double standards of Canada and the United Kingdom as follows:

Some governments, such as Canada and the United Kingdom, are not only failing to honour their promises but have also actually taken vaccine doses from COVAX, despite the extreme shortages in LMICs and having already secured more than enough doses through bilateral agreements. In the case of the UK, the government accepted over half a million doses from COVAX in June 2021. Just before this in March 2021, the UK also imported millions of doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine manufactured in India – a supply AZ had previously publicly reported was for the specific benefit of low and middle-income countries. The Canadian government acquired 972,000 doses through COVAX. Meanwhile, the UK has only delivered on 9.6 percent of its pledged donations to LMICs, and Canada even less at 8 percent.

We saw Canada’s and Trudeau’s double standards coming didn’t we?

Canada and COVAX

In a definitive statement announcing the arrangements COVAX had supposedly put in place to “access nearly two billion doses” of then promising COVID-19 vaccine candidates “on behalf of 190 participating economies,” issued December 18, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) described COVAX as “the global initiative to ensure rapid and equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines for all countries, regardless of income level”. COVAX, according to the WHO, aims “to accelerate the development and manufacture of COVID-19 vaccines, and to guarantee fair and equitable access for every country in the world.”

Co-led by the WHO, Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, COVAX publicly recognizes the fact that poor BIPOC-majority countries in Africa, South East Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America and other parts of the Global South won’t be able to strike meaningful bilateral vaccination supply deals with major COVID-19 vaccine manufacturers, most of which are based in white-majority G7 countries.

Canada and several rich countries with white majorities either joined or publicly supported the COVAX facility when it was created in early 2020. It’s reasonable to assume that, by bringing Canada into the COVAX initiative, Trudeau expressed a kinship with Black Africans and the BIPOC majorities of the low-income countries of the Global South. That’s certainly not the case.

COVID-19 vaccine apartheid

In its report, the People’s Vaccine Alliance called for “urgent and bold actions to make good on previous promises, and urgently address today’s vaccine apartheid.” Jonathan Shaffer, a co-founder of Right to Health Action and Ph.D. candidate in sociology at Boston University, recently described COVID-19 vaccine apartheid as “the injustice built into the current and persistent inequalities in vaccine access. The map of current Covid-19 vaccine access overlays neatly onto much older maps of colonial conquest.”

The world reached the unprecedented scientific milestone of developing safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines within 16 months of the identification of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, according to the international journal Nature.

The injustice of COVID-19 vaccine apartheid, which transcends national borders, stands in the way of wealthy countries’ stated commitments of “ending the pandemic in 2022″, “vaccinating at least 60% of the global population”, and vaccinating “the world by getting as many safe vaccines to as many people as possible as fast as possible”. It’s emergence has been an open secret from the very beginning.

In May 2020, a paper published by the Lancet warned about the “real” spectre of wealthy countries using their deep pockets to monopolize the global supply of future COVID-19 vaccines. Also in May 2020, Jane Halton, a former WHO board member and Australian chairperson of the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations, warned that the development of safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines could trigger “vaccine nationalism” – a situation where “one country looks after itself first” and prioritizes its citizens’ survival “at the expense of the rest of the world”.

Last November, as safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines began to appear on the horizon, WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus warned about the “real risk that the poorest and most vulnerable will be trampled in the stampede for vaccines”. The WHO chief urged the international community to “set a new standard for access,” arguing that “the urgency with which vaccines have been developed must be matched by the same urgency to distribute them fairly.”

Canada is not only one of the wealthy G7 and EU countries the People’s Vaccine Alliance report fingered for hoarding “many more” life-saving doses than they need “despite international efforts to establish collaborative technology sharing and equitable allocation of COVID-19 vaccines”. Trudeau’s Canada is at the heart of burgeoning global COVID-19 vaccine apartheid.

In the last 5 months of 2020, even before the vaccines had been approved, Canada and other wealthy countries with white majorities hoarded most of the emerging COVID-19 vaccines, leaving dozens of low-income, BIPOC-majority countries with next to nothing. They signed 44 bilateral vaccine supply deals with West-based pharmaceutical companies developing the vaccines.

An editorial piece published by The Lancet on December 18, 2020, stated that “the EU, the UK, the USA, and Canada have already made deals with manufacturers to buy more than 50% of the doses expected to be available in 2021, despite these countries representing only 14% of the global population.”

By December 2020, Canada had grabbed a staggering 362 million doses of the different COVID-19 vaccines that had been developed through bilateral supply deals with western pharmaceutical companies. At the time, that was enough COVID-19 vaccine doses to vaccinate each one of Canada’s 38 million citizens and residents at least 9.6 times over.

At the beginning of 2021, Canada and other wealthy countries signed 12 more bilateral deals with COVID-19 vaccine developers, according to the WHO.

While addressing the Executive Board of the WHO in January, Ghebreyesus lamented the fact that, while life-saving COVID-19 vaccines now brought hope to some, they had also “become another brick in the wall of inequality between the world’s haves and have-nots.” The WHO chief said:

More than 39 million doses of vaccine have now been administered in at least 49 higher-income countries. Just 25 doses have been given in one lowest-income country. Not 25 million; not 25 thousand; just 25.

I need to be blunt: the world is on the brink of a catastrophic moral failure – and the price of this failure will be paid with lives and livelihoods in the world’s poorest countries.

Even as they speak the language of equitable access, some countries and companies continue to prioritize bilateral deals, going around COVAX, driving up prices and attempting to jump to the front of the queue. This is wrong.

As per the People’s Vaccine Alliance report, “the Canadian government acquired 972,000 doses through COVAX” well after the WHO chief’s dire warning of an emerging “catastrophic moral failure” relating to the global distribution of life-saving COVID-19 vaccines. Months after grabbing a staggering 362 million COVID-19 vaccine doses through bilateral supply deals with vaccine manufacturers.

In “The Pandemic and the Economic Crisis“, an interim paper published in March, Nobel laureates Joseph Stiglitz and Michael Spence decried “the ugliness of vaccine and other aspects of pandemic nationalism”. The paper noted that Canada was one of the rich, white-dominated countries that “have ordered vaccine shots for more than ten times their current population” in violation of the “ethos of COVAX” and the global alliance’s main objective of facilitating “access to vaccines for all”.

Canada has repeatedly justified its unfair hijacking of life-saving COVID-19 vaccine doses through COVAX. For example, as recently reported by CTV News, while “Canada has come under fire for tapping into the COVAX supply to access AstraZeneca vaccines,” the Trudeau government “has taken the position that Canada was using the program as designed, and noted it’s one of the leading donors to the effort. Canada has spent $440 million towards the COVAX initiative, half of which was intended for Canada to be able to secure up to 15 million doses for use in this country, and the other $220 million to go towards lower-income nations’ purchases of vaccines.”

G7 summit

At the conclusion of the 2021 G7 summit, Trudeau and the leaders of the world’s leading economies pledged, through the G7 summit’s final communiqué, to “end the pandemic and prepare for the future by driving an intensified international effort, starting immediately, to vaccinate the world by getting as many safe vaccines to as many people as possible as fast as possible”. They loudly promised to collectively donate only 1 billion COVID-19 vaccine doses to low- and middle-income countries over the next year.

A Reuters analysis published after the G7 summit stated that the supposedly generous donation was “far short of the 5 billion to 6 billion shots needed by poorer nations.”

Tedros Ghebreyesus, the WHO chief, issued a stinging rebuttal of the G7’s white saviour industrial complex-informed vaccine doses pledge while addressing reporters in June. He said:

The global failure to share vaccines equitably is fueling a two-track pandemic that is now taking its toll on some of the world’s poorest and most vulnerable people. Every region has countries that are now facing a steep increase in cases and deaths. Many countries in Latin America have rapidly increasing epidemics, and others have plateaued at a high level.

In Africa, cases have increased by 52% just in the past week, and deaths have increased by 32%. And we expect things to only get worse. Less than 1% of Africa’s population has been vaccinated.

Vaccines donated next year will be far too late for those who are dying today, or being infected today, or at risk today.

The WHO’s original “global targets” included vaccinating “at least 10% of the population of every country by September” 2021, “at least 40% by the end of the year, and 70% by the middle of next year.”

While Canada and the United Kingdom have unfairly grabbed vaccine doses from the WHO-supported COVAX global vaccine distribution facility “despite the extreme shortages in LMICs and having already secured more than enough doses through bilateral agreements”, COVAX recently slashed by a staggering 25 percent its estimates of total vaccines to be delivered to low- and middle-income countries through the facility in 2021, from 2 billion doses to 1.4 billion doses, according to the People’s Vaccine Alliance’s report.

As reported by the New York Times‘ COVID-19 vaccinations tracker:

Less wealthy countries are relying on a vaccine-sharing arrangement called Covax, which originally aimed to provide two billion doses by the end of the year but has repeatedly cut its forecasts because of production problems, export bans and vaccine hoarding by wealthy nations. In its latest projection, it expected to have a total of 1.4 billion doses available by the end of 2021.

The People’s Vaccine Alliance report called COVAX’s slashing of estimated vaccine deliveries an “unacceptable cutback” that “makes a catastrophic situation even worse” for low- and middle-income countries.

Cooking the books

Meanwhile, Trudeau and other G7 leaders deliberately cooked the books on that white saviour industrial complex-tinged 1 billion COVID-19 vaccine doses pledge to low- and middle-income countries.

The Reuters analysis referenced above stated that the G7’s pledge “does not represent entirely new resources”. Reporting for Bloomberg, and referencing the G7 summit’s final communiqué, Alberto Nardelli and Josh Wingrove explained:

So far, the G-7 countries have promised 613 million truly new doses – including some funded in part by previously announced aid. If doses already announced in recent weeks by G-7 and EU nations are included, the tally grows to roughly 870 million doses, according to the communique. To reach the 1 billion figure, G-7 officials included pledges made starting back in February.

Referring to Canada’s pledge, Nardelli and Wingrove wrote:

The Canadian pledge includes 13 million directly donated doses as well as a previously announced C$440 million ($361.9 million) pledge to Covax. Counting that money, Canada framed its donation as up to 100 million doses total, though only the 13 million are new.

We saw Trudeau’s cooking of Canada’s white saviour industrial complex-tinged vaccine pledge coming, didn’t we?

On the even of the G7 summit, U.S. President Joe Biden announced, in a speech “steeped in the imagery of World War II and other eras defined by their need for urgent collective action,” Politico reported on June 10th, the United States’ grand plan to purchase and donate 500 million COVID-19 vaccine doses to the rest of the world. Meanwhile, the UK pledged to “donate 100m surplus coronavirus vaccine doses within the next year to low-income countries as part of at least 1bn doses due from the G7,” reported The Guardian.

Prime Minister Trudeau, the leader of a white-majority G7 country that makes the loudest noise on the world stage about “international development” and “making a difference” against poverty and disease in poor countries around the world, only reluctantly confirmed Canada’s supposedly generous COVID-19 vaccine donation to the BIPOC-majority countries and communities of the Global South. He entered the first day of the G7 summit “as the only leader who has yet to pledge how many vaccine doses his country will donate to less wealthy nations,” reported The Canadian Press.

As reported by CTV News, the Liberal government’s plan for Canada “to contribute up to 100 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines to developing countries” was confirmed “after Trudeau was the only leader among his G7 peers who had yet to outline what his country’s contribution would be.” Furthermore, Trudeau’s COVID-19 donation plan included “both actual doses and through previously-announced funding to the COVAX global vaccine-sharing initiative.”

“The sharing of doses will happen once Canada’s domestic vaccine rollout is complete,” CTV News reported.

This is the Canada of the same “compassionate” Justin Trudeau who “has on several occasions spoken about how Canada’s position is that until COVID-19 is controlled everywhere, the pandemic won’t truly be over anywhere, given the risks of new variants and outbreaks.” As per the People’s Vaccine Alliance report, while “no one is safe until everyone is safe” is the mantra “pharmaceutical corporations and rich country governments persistently pursue the opposite.”

Africans paying a terrible price

The New York Times‘ COVID-19 vaccinations tracker uses data from several reputable sources, including the Our World in Data project at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. The tracker confirms that Black Africans and other non-white peoples and communities of Africa, South East Asia, the Caribbean and Latin America are paying a terrible price for Canada’s COVID-19 vaccine hoarding, unfair grabbing of COVID-19 doses from the COVAX global vaccine sharing facility, and unfulfilled, headline-seeking white saviour industrial complex-informed vaccine donation promises to low- and middle-income countries of the Global South.

On October 23, 2021, the tracker reported that while “more than 3.81 billion people worldwide have received a dose of a Covid-19 vaccine, equal to about 49.7 percent of the world population,” there was a “striking gap between vaccination programs in different countries”.

Meanwhile, according to the tracker, COVAX’s slashing of projections of global COVID-19 vaccine distribution from 2 billion to “a total of 1.4 billion doses” by the end of 2021 “has led to a striking divide between regions of the world. Africa has the slowest vaccination rate of any continent, with just 8 percent of the population receiving at least one dose of a vaccine.”

The NYT’s tracker describes a “vaccinated person” as “someone who has received at least one dose of a vaccine,” and a “fully vaccinated person” as someone who “has received all required doses of a vaccine.”

According to the tracker, as of October 23, 2021, Canada had “vaccinated” 79% and “fully vaccinated” 74% of its citizens and residents. Canada had administered a total of 58,076,097 doses or 155 per 100 people.

Canada had also administered more than 447,000 “additional doses”, described by the NYT’s vaccinations tracker as doses that “include booster doses given to fully vaccinated individuals when the protection from the original shots has begun to decline, as well as extra shots given to people, such as the immunocompromised, who did not have a strong immune response from their initial doses. More than 49.9 million additional doses have been administered worldwide, with many more countries expected to start administering them soon.”

By comparison, an overwhelming majority of Black African- and BIPOC-majority countries and communities of Africa, South East Asia, The Caribbean, Latin America and other parts of the Global South, from whose half-guarded economies Canada extracts tens of millions of dollars every year through largely unaccountable extractive businesses, remain in what UN human rights experts recently called a situation where “they see vaccines as a mirage or a privilege for the developed world”.

According to the People’s Vaccine Alliance report “only 0.7 percent of all manufactured vaccine doses have gone to low-income countries” so far.

As per the WHO chief’s June 18, 2021, media address, the WHO’s original “global targets” included vaccinating “at least 10%” of the populations of Africa’s 54 countries, which have overwhelming Black and BIPOC majorities, by September 2021, “at least 40% by the end of the year, and 70% by the middle of next year.”

Before the G7 summit, UN News published a piece titled, “Nine in 10 African nations set to miss urgent COVID vaccination goal“. Then Africa, the world’s second-largest and second-most populous continent, had accessed only 32 million of 2.1 billion COVID-19 doses administered globally.

According to the article:

At 32 million doses, Africa accounts for less than one per cent of the more than 2.1 billion doses administered globally. Just two per cent of the continent’s nearly 1.3 billion people have received one dose, and only 9.4 million Africans are fully vaccinated… “ It’s do or die on dose sharing for Africa,” said Dr Matshidiso Moeti, WHO Regional Director for Africa.

The article explained the situation behind the “WHO’s reminder that 225 million doses of vaccine are needed urgently on the continent,” a reminder that came “as coronavirus infections increased there for the third consecutive week.” Then Africa had “registered nearly five million COVID-19 infections to date” and the numbers had “increased by nearly 20 per cent – to more than 88,000 – in the week ending 6 June.”

As of mid-June, “less than 1%” of Africa’s current population of 1.37 billion people had been vaccinated, according to the WHO chief. As of the end of June, after the white saviour industrial complex-informed pledge by Trudeau and other G7 leaders to “end the pandemic and prepare for the future by driving an intensified international effort, starting immediately, to vaccinate the world by getting as many safe vaccines to as many people as possible as fast as possible,” as per the G7 summit’s final communiqué, Africa had received only about 2% of one billion COVID-19 vaccine doses administered worldwide.

The NYT’s COVID-19 vaccinations tracker confirmed that, as of October 23, 2021, most of the Black-majority countries of sub-Saharan Africa had missed the WHO’s evidence-based target of vaccinating “at least 10%” of their populations by the end of September. Africa, the tracker noted, had “the slowest vaccination rate of any continent, with just 8 percent of the population receiving at least one dose of a vaccine.”

According to the tracker, as of October 23, 2021:

  • Zambia had “vaccinated” only 0.7% and “fully vaccinated” a mere 2.9% of its population, compared to Canada’s 79% (“vaccinated”) and 74% (“fully vaccinated”). Zambia had administered only 871,881 COVID-19 doses or 4.9 per 100 people, compared to Canada’s total of 58,076,097 doses or 155 per 100 people.
  • Mozambique had “vaccinated” only 6.5% and “fully vaccinated” 6% of its population, compared to Canada’s 79% (“vaccinated”) and 74% (“fully vaccinated”). Mozambique had administered only 3,799,385 COVID-19 doses or 13per 100 people, compared to Canada’s total of 58,076,097 doses or 155 per 100 people.
  • Tanzania had “vaccinated” only 1.5% and “fully vaccinated” 1.5% of its population, compared to Canada’s 79% (“vaccinated”) and 74% (“fully vaccinated”). Tanzania had administered only 885,579 COVID-19 doses or 1.5 per 100 people, compared to Canada’s total of 58,076,097 doses or 155 per 100 people.
  • Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) had “vaccinated” only 0.1% and “fully vaccinated” less than 1% of its population, compared to Canada’s 79% (“vaccinated”) and 74% (“fully vaccinated”). The DRC had administered only 144,980 COVID-19 doses or 0.2 per 100 people, compared to Canada’s total of 58,076,097 doses or 155 per 100 people.
  • Kenya had “vaccinated” only 6,5% and “fully vaccinated” 2.5% of its population, compared to Canada’s 79% (“vaccinated”) and 74% (“fully vaccinated”). Kenya had administered only 4,733,385 COVID-19 doses or 9 per 100 people, compared to Canada’s total of 58,076,097 doses or 155 per 100 people.
  • South Sudan had “vaccinated” only 0.8% and “fully vaccinated” 0.3% of its population, compared to Canada’s 79% (“vaccinated”) and 74% (“fully vaccinated”). Sudan had administered only 122,889 COVID-19 doses or 1.1 per 100 people, compared to Canada’s total of 58,076,097 doses or 155 per 100 people.
  • Nigeria had “vaccinated” only 2.7% and “fully vaccinated” 1.4% of its population, compared to Canada’s 79% (“vaccinated”) and 74% (“fully vaccinated”). Nigeria had administered only 8,188,883 COVID-19 doses or 4.1 per 100 people, compared to Canada’s total of 58,076,097 doses or 155 per 100 people.
  • Ghana had “vaccinated” only 6.3% and “fully vaccinated” 2.7% of its population, compared to Canada’s 79% (“vaccinated”) and 74% (“fully vaccinated”). Ghana had administered only 2,727,537 COVID-19 doses or 9 per 100 people, compared to Canada’s total of 58,076,097 doses or 155 per 100 people.
  • Mali had “vaccinated” only 1.7% and “fully vaccinated” a mere 3% of its population, compared to Canada’s 79% (“vaccinated”) and 74% (“fully vaccinated”). Mali had administered only 584,773 COVID-19 doses or 3 per 100 people, compared to Canada’s total of 58,076,097 doses or 155 per 100 people.
  • Cameroon had “vaccinated” only 1.6% and “fully vaccinated” a mere 0.6% of its population, compared to Canada’s 79% (“vaccinated”) and 74% (“fully vaccinated”). Cameroon had administered only 490,604 COVID-19 doses or 1.9 per 100 people, compared to Canada’s total of 58,076,097 doses or 155 per 100 people.
  • Chad had “vaccinated” only 1% and “fully vaccinated” 0.3% of its population, compared to Canada’s 79% (“vaccinated”) and 74% (“fully vaccinated”). Chad had administered only 199,576 COVID-19 doses or 1.3 per 100 people, compared to Canada’s total of 58,076,097 doses or 155 per 100 people.
  • Ethiopia had “vaccinated” only 2.7% and “fully vaccinated” 0.9% of its population, compared to Canada’s 79% (“vaccinated”) and 74% (“fully vaccinated”). Ethiopia had administered only 4,048,361 COVID-19 doses or 3.6 per 100 people, compared to Canada’s total of 58,076,097 doses or 155 per 100 people.

The 972,000 COVID-19 doses Canada unfairly grabbed from the COVAX global vaccine sharing facility “despite the extreme shortages in LMICs and having already secured more than enough doses through bilateral agreements” would have made a huge difference in any of these countries. The 112,030 vaccine doses Canada generously donated to white-majority high income countries, according to the People’s Vaccine Alliance report, would have saved the lives of numerous health workers and other professionals in these countries.

Back in April, former British prime minister Gordon Brown argued that Canada and other G7 countries “can afford to pay 60% of the costs of vaccinating developing countries,” adding:

Immunising the west but only a fraction of the developing world is already fueling allegations of ‘vaccine apartheid’ and will leave Covid-19 spreading, mutating and threatening the lives and livelihoods of us all for years to come.

Below are a few more shocking highlights from the People’s Vaccine Alliance report:

  • Just 14 percent, or 261 million of the 1.8 billion donated doses promised by the G7 and Team Europe (the EU plus Iceland and Norway) have been delivered to low- and middle-income countries.
  • Inexplicably, G7 countries and Team Europe have donated over 10 million doses to other high-income countries during the pandemic, or 4 percent of total donations they have provided throughout the pandemic.
  • At least 100 million vaccine doses could go unused and expire in G7 countries in 2021, and the number of wasted doses could reach up to 241 million. Furthermore, based on their current donation pledges, the number of wasted doses could rise to 800 million by mid-2022 due to expiration.
  • Currently, more than 64 percent of the population in the EU is now fully vaccinated, compared to only 4.8 percent of all people on the African continent.

So far, “Asia and Africa have suffered the largest percentage increase in excess deaths, with Asia experiencing a 700 percent increase in deaths, and Africa suffering through an 800 percent increase,”according to the People’s Vaccine Alliance’s report. The damning report’s findings “show that people in low-and middle-income countries cannot trust and should not have to rely on the charitable goodwill of rich nations and pharmaceutical corporations to fulfil their right to protection from COVID-19. The time has come for all governments, starting at the G20 Summit in October 2021, to collectively decide if they want to continue down a road of broken promises, or to find a new way forward that can protect us all and enable the world to exit the pandemic.”

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Obert Madondo
Obert Madondo is an Ottawa-based blogger, activist, photographer, digital rights enthusiast, former political aide, and former international development administrator. Obert is the founder and editor of The Canadian Progressive and The Zimbabwean Progressive, both of which are independent political blogs dedicated to producing fearless, progressive, adversarial, unapologetic, and activism-oriented journalism situated right at the intersection of politics, technology and human rights. Follow Obert on Twitter: @Obiemad
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